‘Fatal shot Baldwin could have been prevented’, production company fined

Actor Alec Baldwin probably wouldn‘t have fired a fatal shot during the shooting of the film Rust if the production company had complied with all safety regulations. This concludes that a government agency that has been investigating the deadly shooting incident on the set of the Western in recent months. The production company is fined almost 137,000 dollars, converted more than 126,000 euros.

Baldwin shot the Rust set with a loaded gun last year. In addition, 42-year-old camera woman Halyna Hutchins was fatally hit and a director suffered injuries. The actor has kept saying that he didn’t know there were bullets in the gun.

โ€œIndifferentโ€

According to the investigation firm, the Rust crew deliberately ignored the safety regulations on the set. The film crew would not have considered the safety of employees important enough. There was โ€œindifferenceโ€ about the risks posed by actors and other employees, say the researchers.

โ€œOur research shows that this tragic accident would never have happened if Rust‘s production company had complied with national film industry standards for firearm safety,โ€ said one of the researchers. He speaks of the โ€œcomplete failure of the employerโ€.

Baldwin opened up more about the fatal incident in December, in an interview with the ABC channel:

In addition to the investigation by the government agency of the state of New Mexico, where the fatal shooting incident took place, there is also a police investigation. There are multiple charges against Baldwin, among others from employees of the film.

For example, scripted supervisor Mamie Mitchell accused the actor of irresponsible behavior on set in November. According to her, the script didn’t say Baldwin had to let the gun go off. Relatives of the camera woman killed have also sued the actor. They hold him and the film producers involved responsible for ignoring the safety regulations on set.

In this video, we show how it actually works with weapons on film sets and what the power of blanks is: