Germany asks for clarification of espionage case Denmark

The German Government wants clarification on the revelation by Danish public service broadcaster DR that the Danish secret service has helped the American intelligence service NSA in eavesdropping Chancellor Merkel.

A spokesman for the German Government did not want to respond to the substance of the matter today. โ€œThe German Government has contacted all relevant national and international authorities for clarification,โ€ he said to press agency Reuters.

Bild writes that Merkel first heard about listening through the publications of DR, in collaboration with German, Norwegian, Swedish and French media.

‘Unacceptable’

In addition to Merkel, Federal President and former Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier and former German opposition leader Peer Steinbrรผck of the SPD were spying on the same way. They also say that until yesterday they did not know anything about the eavesdropping.

The Danish Defence Minister Trine Bramsen was reported to have been informed about the espionage in August 2020. She stated to DR that โ€œsystematic tapping of close alliesโ€ is unacceptable.

According to the publications, the Danish secret service actively participated in the espionage of European allies. The Danish government may have been aware of the activities since 2015.

Access to Internet cables

Several submarine cables come together in and around Denmark, making the Scandinavian country a strategic internet hub. Emails, text messages and phone calls have been tapped.

The Swedish Minister of Defence Peter Hulqvist also wants Denmark to explain. โ€œWe want all the cards on the table,โ€ said Hulqvist to press agency AP. The minister called it โ€œunacceptableโ€ to eavesdrop allies.

The Danish broadcaster reported last year that the NSA spies on European allies, including the Netherlands, from Denmark. This would have been an abuse of an agreement allowing the NSA to access Internet cables to Eastern Europe in exchange for Danish access to American fiber optic cables in Denmark.