Majority Senate finds trial Trump constitutional

A majority in the United States Senate has, through a vote, indicated that the trial against Donald Trump is constitutional. The historical impeachment procedure can thus be continued. That happens Wednesday noon 12.00 (local time). 56 senators agreed to the constitutionality of the trial and 44 voted against.

The vote followed the opening statements of the Democratic Prosecutors and the defence of the Republican former President. Trumps counselors argued that the whole procedure is unconstitutional because he is no longer president. For this reason, the lawyers say no longer make sense.

The fact that there is a majority in the Senate to prosecute Trump for his part in the violent storm of the Capitol was clear beforehand. At the end of last month, the Senate already voted on a motion from Republican Senator Rand Paul stating that prosecution of Trump would be unconstitutional. That one didnt make it. Of the hundred senators, 55 voted against the motion, including five Republicans. The remaining 45 Republicans were in favour of stopping the prosecution.

Pauls motion and Tuesdays vote show that the Democratic Prosecutors are facing quite a challenge, because condemning Trump requires the support of two-thirds of the senators present. That means that at least seventeen Republicans have to agree with the Democrats in the equally divided Senate.

Accountability

Trump must answer in the Senate for โ€œinciting insurrectionโ€ in the run-up to the storming of the Parliament building on January 6. An angry crowd moved to the Washington Capitol after a speech by the then president, where politicians were in the process of approving the election victory of the Democrat Joe Biden. Trumps supporters ran under the foot of the police and invaded the building. Five people were killed.

The

persecution of Trump after the deadly riots can be called historical for several reasons. Trump was the only president who had to deal with an expulsion procedure twice. He also goes into history as the first former president to be persecuted by Congress.